This Week's Favourite Fraggl Links

Here are my favourite links from this week, curated by Fraggl:

  • "Each year, Mary Meeker unveils her fascinating Internet Trends presentation. And each year, her insights are inestimable and eagerly awaited. But each year, I have a problem with her slides. As a presentation designer, I find them rough and busy. To the point it makes them hard to understand. So this year, here’s my humble attempt at redesigning them!" Well done that man
  • Mixby. An app that uses beacons to unlock content and museums and events. Rather cool.
  • A wonderful, wide-ranging interview with (Ogilvy Vice-Chairman) Rory Sutherland on branding, behavioural economics and much else besides
  • What causes the smell of new and old books? Now you know.

Aroma-Chemistry-The-Smell-of-Books-724x1024

And of-course you can sign up to Fraggl here.


This Week's Favourite Fraggl Links

Adam Magyar, Array #1 from Adam Magyar on Vimeo.

Here are my favourite links from this week, curated by Fraggl:

  • More Adam Magyar brilliance (above). A "high speed video recording at Seoul at Sindorim Station of people descending on stairs while changing from Line 1 to Line 2".
  • Makes sense - NBC Universal found that (FT £) a TV show’s ratings are more likely to determine social media activity rather than social media driving viewership.
  • good piece on how our use of distancing language ('user', 'product', 'content') can counter-act empathy
  • A great Vice interview with Tom Uglow (Creative Director of Google Labs in Sydney): "Most of my projects attempt to defuse landmines of precociousness"

And of-course you can try Fraggl out here.


Persistence

Baileys stardust

In between meetings yesterday I went to look at the David Bailey exhibition, curated by the man himself at the National Portrait Gallery (which was wonderful) and in one of the displays typed onto a piece of card was this quote:

"Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'Press On' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race." Calvin Coolidge


Hacking the Concept of Time

I really enjoyed this profile of Adam Magyar, the 'renegade' self-taught photographer who combines sophisticated photographic equipment, other retro-fitted hardware, self-written software, and an artist's eye to unique effect. In 'Stainless', speeding subway cars and their passengers (often seemingly lost in their own worlds) are captured in exceptionally high resolution. Part of the project involved filming New Yorkers standing on the platform at Grand Central station with a slow motion camera (preview above - watch it full screen). It's strangely poignant. When great technology and great art combine wonderful things happen. This is a great example of that.


Marina and Ulay

The Kickstarter 'Projects We Love' email told me about performance artist Marina Abramovic's endeavour to fund 'a living, breathing museum for performance art, where attendees not only visit, but participate.' Marina is famous of-course for (amongst many other things) her performace piece The Artist Is Present which in 2010 broke MoMA attendance records and which saw Abramović sitting in a chair facing a succession of her fans who sat across from her in silence for as long as they wished.

In the 1970s and 80s Marina had an intense romantic and artistic relationship with another performance artist Ulay. They ended their relationship in 1988 on the Great Wall of China with a performance piece (a 'spiritual journey') which involved each of them walking from opposite ends and meeting in the middle where they said goodbye to each other. They've rarely seen each other since. But twenty two years later, Ulay made a surprise visit to the opening of Marina's show. The emotional connection between the two of them made for an incredibly intense moment.